Category: Movement

Public Health Ministry, NHSO, ThaiHealth, and Local Administrative Bodies Meet Up to  Make Thailand’s Long-Term Care System Stronger and More Sustainable
Post

Public Health Ministry, NHSO, ThaiHealth, and Local Administrative Bodies Meet Up to Make Thailand’s Long-Term Care System Stronger and More Sustainable

Dr. Narong Saiwongse, deputy permanent secretary for Public Health, has praised the National Health Security Office’s (NHSO) Long-Term Care Fund as a good solution to Thailand’s aging society. In his view, the LTC Fund practically increases the quality of life among both the elderly and dependent patients. “Because no ageing society can avoid dependent people, it is necessary to develop service system for the dependent. We need to do this to ensure people losing their independence can still have quality of life,” Dr. Narong told the LTC Forum 2020. Held by the Human Resources for Health Research and Development Office (HRDO) as a part of its project to learn from the LTC Fund management, the event ran from November 17 to 18, 2020 under the Moving together to Sustainable LTC theme. The Thai Health Promotion Foundation (ThaiHealth) has funded this project. The NHSO established the LTC Fund in 2016 to take care of dependent elderly. Thanks to the fund, long-term care has been provided to people who cannot perform activities of daily living on their own and need help from others. The LTC fund has used local administrative bodies namely subdistrict administrative organizations and subdistrict municipalities as key mechanisms for...

Regulations on community-public health profession is promulgated in the Royal Gazette
Post

Regulations on community-public health profession is promulgated in the Royal Gazette

Regulations on community-public health profession: Promulgated in the Royal Gazette they prescribe the criteria of community-public health practitioners, basic health assessments, and basic treatments. On 21 July 2020, the Royal Gazette made announcements on three legislation related to community-public health professions. Firstly, the Public Health Ministry’s Regulation on Basic Treatment Limitations of B.E. 2563 stipulates that community-public health practitioners must hold a valid license of community-public health profession. They cannot practice in events that their license is suspended/revoked or expires. Practitioners of community-public health must provide basic treatments in accordance with the Council of Community-Public Health’s regulation on limitations and conditions of practice as well as professional standards. Secondly, the Council of Community-Public Health’s Regulation on Criteria and Conditions of Basic Health Assessments, Basic Treatments, Patient Care, Immunization, and Family Planning of B.E. 2563 specifies which diseases community-public health practitioners can assess and provide treatments for. Among them are high fever, stomachache, malnutrition, skin problems, oral ulcers, resuscitation, and emergency child deliveries. Thirdly, the Council of Community-Public Health’s Regulation on Criteria and Conditions of Basic Health Assessments for Patient Referrals of B.E. 2563 requires that community-public health practitioners refer patients to better-equipped facilities and inform them/their relatives of the referral...

The conversation with Dr. Samrerng Yangkratoke’s Push for Three-Doctor Policy
Post

The conversation with Dr. Samrerng Yangkratoke’s Push for Three-Doctor Policy

Thailand is now upgrading its primary-healthcare system in terms of quality and accessibility via the initiative to assign three doctors to each family. The three-doctor policy recognizes a village health volunteer as the first doctor for providing healthcare services at community level, an official of a district health promotion hospital as the second doctor for giving healthcare at sub-district level, and a family physician as the third doctor for delivering services at district level. The policy seeks to ensure these three doctors work together systematically, making further progress from the universal coverage healthcare scheme. The Human Resources for Health Research and Development Office interviews Dr. Samrerng Yangkratoke, vice minister for Public Health, as he is the man behind this three-doctor policy.   How did the three-doctor policy start? The formulation of this policy started because we wanted to develop the country’s healthcare system further and we took account the opinions of many. First of all, we paid attention to a goal mentioned at a World Health Organization (WHO) meeting in Astana back in 2018. Developed based on the Alma Mater Declaration on primary-healthcare development, that goal demands that every country create primary-healthcare sustainability for its people. Secondly, we paid attention...

Time to eliminate risks at hospitals
Post

Time to eliminate risks at hospitals

On the night of July 5, a man entered the Phuphaman Hospital in Khon Kaen province and attempted a sexual assault against a female nurse. Fortunately, relatives of patients at the hospital came to her rescue in time. The attacker fled the scene but was arrested the following day. Two weeks later, a doctor based at the emergency room (ER) of the Vibharam Chaiprakarn Hospital in Samut Prakan province was physically attacked as friends of a patient who died on his way to the hospital got enraged. Those angry friends attacked the doctor and destroyed properties inside the ER. They would later raid and ravage the ER of the Muangsamut Poochao Hospital too. These two incidents are just a tip of an iceberg, when it comes to problems facing medical workers in many areas. The editorial team of Human Resources for Health Research and Development Office’s Butterfly Effect booklet has compiled information of medical workers’ risks before. These risks can be categorized as below: Direct risks from medical-service delivery such as being pierced accidentally by a needle, being infected, being exposed to patients’ body fluids, and being assaulted by patients. Such risks are particularly high for staff working with psychiatric...

Khamporn Ketkaeo’s 16 Years as Village Health Volunteer and Response to COVID-19
Post

Khamporn Ketkaeo’s 16 Years as Village Health Volunteer and Response to COVID-19

It is now clear to the whole world that Thailand’s village health volunteers have played a crucial role in the surveillance and control of COVID-19. The Human Resources for Health Research and Development Office thus sits down with Khamporn Ketkaeo for insights. Based in Chandee sub-district of Nakhon Si Thammarat’s Chawang district, Khamporn was named the province’s outstanding village health volunteer in the field of local wisdom for health in 2015. How did you become a village health volunteer? I have worked as a village health volunteer since 2004. Before that, I used to live in Bangkok for quite a long time. I had spent years studying and working in the capital. Even though I was laid off in the wake of the 1997 Financial Crisis, I had continued living in Bangkok. One day, I saw an announcement about the Pennapa Subcharoen of Institute of Thai Traditional Medicine offering a course and decided to enroll. It took me four years, from 1999 to 2003, to complete the course. After the completion, I have been licensed to practice Thai traditional medicine. I can provide massages, prepare herbs, and provide treatments based on traditional knowledge. I headed back to my hometown in...

New Normal Medical Service: A Medical Visit Will Never Be the Same
Post

New Normal Medical Service: A Medical Visit Will Never Be the Same

COVID-19 has forced humans into a new normal. People must change their old ways of life so as to curb the risks of getting infected and spreading the virus. Given its exposure to pathogens, healthcare system is one of the key systems with a high risk of being a spreader.  The Public Health Ministry therefore has prescribed new normal medical service for all medical facilities. Deputy Prime Minister and Public Health Minister Mr. Anutin Charnvirakul says the new normal medical service involves adjustments made to not just infrastructure but also service-delivery methods. Regarding infrastructure, space management must be revamped to ease crowding for the safety of both healthcare workers and service users. Equipment must also be erected to keep distance between them, with clear designation of each service area. For inpatient care, medical facilities must prepare a cohort ward for patients with pneumonia to isolate them from others. Regarding service-delivery methods, medical facilities must try to minimize the number of personnel and patients. They must categorize their patients into two groups. The first group refers to patients who need to see a doctor. When providing services to these patients, modern equipment and technologies should be deployed more to reduce risks...

Village Health Volunteers are Hard-to-Imitate Worker Ants in Thailand’s Healthcare System
Post

Village Health Volunteers are Hard-to-Imitate Worker Ants in Thailand’s Healthcare System

Days ago, the World Health Organization (WHO) lauded Thai village health volunteers’ role in controlling the spread of COVID-19 (#COVID19). The praise, so far, is hardly a surprise given that village health volunteers have long been a vital force in Thailand’s primary care system and have contributed to the system’s international reputation. The primary care system of Thailand has earned compliments from the WHO and health organizations of various nations every now and then. WHO has even funded educational trips for other Southeast Asian nations to study Thailand’s primary care system. The recent praise is not the first time WHO has complimented Thailand’s village health volunteers in containing a pandemic. In the wake of avian influenza in 2007, this international organization also wrote in praise of Thai health volunteers for playing a vital role in monitoring and controlling the bird-flu outbreak. That year, WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia – which is based in New Delhi – published an article titled Role of Village Health Volunteers in Avian Influenza Surveillance in Thailand. According to the article, village health volunteers’ contribution is one of the two key factors behind Thailand’s successful avian influenza surveillance. Other countries thus were advised to accord...

Number of Thai Healthcare Workers Infected by COVID-19 Rises by 7 to 87 on April 12
Post

Number of Thai Healthcare Workers Infected by COVID-19 Rises by 7 to 87 on April 12

Dr. Taweesin Visanuyothin, spokesman of the Centre for Covid-19 Situation Administration, updated the public on April 12 that the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Thailand rose by 33. Of these new patients, seven were healthcare workers. The total number of healthcare workers infected by COVID-17 thus stood at 87, accounting for 3.41 per cent of Thailand’s 2,551 COVID-19 patients. COVID-19 infections among doctors and healthcare workers have mainly taken place because they provided health services to patients without knowing that the latter have had the new coronavirus. In most such cases, their patients have withheld certain information while seeking services. The infected healthcare workers had served both inpatients and outpatients. They had worked in outpatient ward, inpatient ward, emergency department, dental department, laboratories. Some of the infected are support staff in the healthcare sector. There are also cases whereby healthcare workers contracted COVID-19 from non-work environment. In addition, there are cases that are being investigated as to how healthcare workers got the virus. “COVID-19 infections among healthcare workers are worrying because when they are infected, they need to stop working and go into quarantine. Those in close contact with infected doctors or nurses are likely nurses who will have...

Thai Doctors Demand Drunk-Free Emergency Room Policy
Post

Thai Doctors Demand Drunk-Free Emergency Room Policy

Violence instigated by patients’ relatives or rivals inside hospitals’ emergency rooms has posed a challenge to Thailand’s public-health policymakers. Dr. Sukhum Karnchanapimai, permanent secretary for Public Health, reveals that records show 51 violent incidents have occurred at hospitals under the supervision of his ministry’s Office of Permanent Secretary between 2012 and 2019. Recording 17 incidents, 2018 is the year with the highest number of violent cases while 2013 did not see any case of violence at hospitals. As for 2019, a total of 11 violent incidents were recorded in its first four months alone. Violence have materialized in the forms of brawls between patients or their relatives as well as physical assaults against medical workers. Such violence has killed three medical workers and injured 13 others. Also, it has caused seven deaths of non-medical workers and wounded 43 others. The Medical Council has paid serious attention to such violence because it affects the work safety of medical workers. The council has therefore conducted a survey among medical workers based at emergency rooms across the country between April 20 and 30, 2019. Of 1,726 respondents, doctors have been the group seeing violent incidents most frequently. This group has seen between one...

Management of Human Resources for Health Through HRDO Manager’s Lens
Post

Management of Human Resources for Health Through HRDO Manager’s Lens

 Interview with Dr. Thinakorn Noree (MD and PhD), manager of Human Resources for Health Research and Development Office (HRDO). With more than 14 years in health-workforce management field, he addresses the challenges of his office’s mission and role.  HDRO Role in Thailand’s Healthcare System Positioning itself as an academic platform, HDRO has the duty to conduct researches for a comprehensive range of knowledge related to planning and management of human resources for health so as to provide executives and relevant authorities with useful policy recommendations. HDRO has played a role as a Policy advocator via Policy platforms. At area-based level, it has done its job through the Public Health Ministry. At the national level, it has worked via the National Human Resources for Health Committee. Although HDRO is based at the Public Health Ministry, it seeks to present solutions to not just the ministry but also the country’s overall healthcare sector. One minor mission that HDRO has taken up is to communicate with the public. In our view, the management of human resources for health will be successful only when the society understands the country’s health-workforce system. Managing human resources for health has its conditions and constraints. Given that each...